Señor Grumblecakes (jervo) wrote,
Señor Grumblecakes
jervo

plans for the future

Ahh, the temping life. No work yesterday, so my brother came over in the afternoon and we were high all day. We also watched the DVDs of "Being John Malkovich" and "This is Spinal Tap", which he had never seen before. Then, at night, finished a bass line for a new song; now it just needs a full set of lyrics and some smoothing out.

My brother also gave me a great idea for the Jervo Experience, which is to establish a weekly residency (most likely at the Baggot Inn). **** Jono - if you're reading this - this is what I was totally unable to express yesterday. **** This isn't a necessarily a groundbreaking idea, and it's something that I've thought about doing before, but for some reason it struck a very deep (and apparently hidden) (and also apparently incredibly sensitive) nerve with me, and it could very well be the sort of thing that changes a lot more about me than just my career direction.

See, the bands that I've been in over the last 8 years have had one thing in common: an astounding arrogance. Now, most bands require a certain amount of swagger in order to stay afloat, but the bands that I've been in have been so convinced of our awesomeness that in some cases we even stopped gigging, since we deemed it "irrelevant". We would only gig every 2 months or so, so that our fans would be foaming at the mouth in anticipation by the time we'd announce a new show - not realizing, of course, that our "fans" were really just our friends, and they didn't necessarily think we were the greatest band in the world, assuming that they thought about us for 5 minutes after we'd finish a show. Only once have I ever been in a band that actually had CDs to sell, and even then we only played 2 or 3 shows after we had finished manufacturing them. In other words, we lived in this delusion that the world was waiting for us to make our move, and all we had to do was put in an appearance every now and then, and eventually the record companies would just figure it out.

Obviously this is not how it works. But I've never been the guy, in any band situation, that spoke up about practical matters - I mean, I've played over 100 shows in the last couple years, and I've been solely reponsible for booking maybe 2 of them.

And now, in my solo endeavors, I've been operating under the same principle - gig every 6 weeks or so, think about recording an EP, get upset that I'm not a rock star yet.

This is all wrong. You don't become successful by playing one show for 30 people every 6 weeks - you get successful by playing 6 shows for 5 people every 6 weeks, and those 5 people bring more people to the next one, and so on. I've been playing in front of planted audience members for 8 years, now, and it's no wonder I'm not a rock star - it's the same 30 people every time. The club owners are psyched that there's a good enough draw, so you get to come back, and you start to think that you're on your way - but you're not, obviously, since your friends will always come to your shows until you bore them to death.

So, after the 10/18 show at the Baggot, I'm gonna try to establish a weekly slot, and just start doing it - whether there's 10 people or 100 - and stop treating every gig like it's the end of the world. Doing this will give me room to explore and experiment; it will force me to learn my own lyrics; it will give me a stage presence; it will establish so many things that 4-tracking in my room will not.

In other news, nothing is happening.
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